Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Sorting "Expected" vs. "Unexpected" Behavior Pictures

If you know my philosophy on teaching my kiddos about appropriate behavior, you would know that I think it is fine to categorize behavior as "good" and "bad" when teaching kids with autism.  However, I know this is up for debate with many people.  This is simply my own opinion...when working with kids with lower language skills, I find this concept is easier to latch onto than using more subjective terms.  With that being said, at my new job, the terms of choice are "expected" and "unexpected" behavior.  So, I am trying something new and seeing how it works...I'll keep you posted if I change my mind. ☺ 

Anyways, during our social skills group, one of my staff members did this great sorting activity.  She verbally gave a scenario or explanation of the picture and had the kids sort pictures of expected and unexpected behavior onto 2 different color pieces of paper.  I love sorting activities because I think this is extremely beneficial for kids with autism, most of whom are very visual learners.  I have made these visuals available for FREE here in case you are interested in re-creating this activity in your classroom....I did not make include any terms for behavior...so you can call it whatever you want good/bad, appropriate/inappropriate, expected/unexpected ☺  NowI am curious...what are your terms of choice? 

2 comments:

  1. What I do is start out with good/bad, because those are the terms they know, then segue in to expected/unexpected by telling them that they mean the same thing. However, the students I currently have are fairly high functioning and that works for them . For some of my lower kids in the past, I used just good and bad, precisely for the reason you mentioned . Thanks for the freebie!

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  2. There is a really great social skills curriculum that teaches the vocabulary "expected" and "unexpected" without tying it to "good" or "bad". Instead it works towards connecting individual actions to other people's feelings and thoughts. The target audience for this curriculum is higher functioning kids, although I did modify parts of it to use with my lower functioning students. The curriculum is called "Social Thinking" by Michelle Garcia Winner. If you haven't see her stuff yet, I recommend looking her up. She changed my thinking on this topic.

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